During the COVID-19 pandemic, Ohio musician Zach Frost used the stay-at-home order to begin recording acoustic folk songs which he had been performing live for years but never released. Using his stimulus check to buy a proper guitar and pay for mixing and mastering services, Frost recorded Brandywine at home and e-mailed the individual tracks to longtime friend and producer Tim Waters (Hit The Lights, We Are The Movies) to complete. Included on the EP are traditional 1800s folk song “Wayfaring Stranger,” 2008 original “Dear Love” and “Idol,” the first of many of Frost’s retrolabs, or retroactive collaborations; in which he creates musical accompaniments to old poems and letters.

Deviating from his normal punk and indie rock roots, these songs conjure images of Appalachia, simpler times and the importance of community and family. Available exclusively on social media and www.ZachFrost.com, Brandywine is a precursor to upcoming project Ottumwa, a retrolab album in which Frost creates original music with lyrics derived from poetry written in the 1930s by a great-great-aunt in Iowa.

“Wayfaring Stranger” arranged and performed by Zach Frost. Additional vocals by Lana Hurtado. Bass guitar and keyboards by Tim Waters.”Dear Love” written and performed by Zach Frost. Additional guitars by Tim Waters.

“Idol” arranged and performed by Zach Frost. Lyrics by Edgar Guest. Additional vocals by Lana Hurtado. Bass guitar and keyboards by Tim Waters.

Recorded at Salvage Group Studios and Radio City Records by Zach Frost and Tim Waters. Mixed and mastered at Radio City Records by Tim Waters.

Album cover photography by Stephen Goldstein.

All rights reserved. Lyrics used by permission only. Unauthorized duplication is a violation of applicable laws.
℗ © 2020 Zach Frost

@ZachFrostMusic
www.ZachFrost.com

02 LARGE Brandywine Album Art

Written and performed by Zach Frost.

Additional keyboards and bass guitar written and performed by Tim Waters.

Recorded, mixed and mastered by Tim Waters at Radio City Records in Columbus, Ohio.

Music video produced by Jakob Mooney.

All rights reserved. Lyrics used by permission only. Unauthorized duplication is a violation of applicable laws.

℗ © 2020 Zach Frost
@ZachFrostMusic
http://www.ZachFrost.com

I’ve got a bit of a death wish
Started back when I was eight years old
You can call it selfish
But it’s how my story will be told
My story will be told

Always on the verge of an existential crisis
Will I ever learn just what the meaning of life is?
Always in the wrong place at the wrong time
If I run, there’s nowhere I can hide

I’ve got a bit of a death wish
Started back when I was eight years old
You can call it selfish
But it’s how my story will be told
I was out of control
Spiraled down a dark and empty hole
When I lost my soul
But it’s how my story will be told
My story will be told

Every other day just going through the motions
Feeling somewhat lost, lacking any real devotion
Searching for a lifeline to make up my mind
But the truth is somewhere I can’t find

I’ve got a bit of a death wish
Started back when I was eight years old
You can call it selfish
But it’s how my story will be told
I was out of control
Spiraled down a dark and empty hole
When I lost my soul
But it’s how my story will be told
My story will be told

It’s okay to get help
It’s okay to get better
It’s okay to talk about your problems
And not blame it on the weather

It’s okay to get help
It’s okay to get better
It’s okay to talk about your problems
And not blame it on the weather

If you wanna get help
If you wanna get better
Then you’ve got to talk about your problems
And not blame it on the weather

I had a bit of a death wish
Started back when I was eight years old
You can call it selfish
But it’s how my story will be told
I was out of control
Spiraled down a dark and empty hole
When I lost my soul
But it’s how my story will be told
My story will be told

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Zach Frost to Release New Single “Death Wish” May 1st, 2020

Columbus, OH March 1st, 2020: Ohio indie rocker Zach Frost has announced that he will release new single “Death Wish” accompanied by a music video on Friday, May 1st. Frost released sophomore EP Bucket List in late 2019 and wastes no time consistently recording and releasing new material.

Channeling iconic 80s rock group The Cure, “Death Wish” shows Frost experimenting with keyboards and more dance-driven percussion while still maintaining catchy guitar melodies and punk rock-inspired vocal delivery.

A single release party for “Death Wish” will be held at Craft & Vinyl on Friday, May 1st with Chelsea Ravenn, Lone Taé and My Name Is Fort.

“Death Wish” and its accompanying music video will be available on all music and video streaming platforms on Friday, May 1st.

For more information, visit www.ZachFrost.com and follow Zach on social media @ZachFrostMusic

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Press Contact:

Zach Frost
Press@ZachFrost.com

Facebook Event Cover Photo

Zach Frost to Release Sophomore EP “Bucket List” November 1st, 2019

Columbus, OH September 1st, 2019: Ohio indie rock artist Zach Frost has announced that he will release sophomore EP Bucket List on Friday, November 1st. Frost released debut solo EP I Try Not to Think About the Past in 2018 between touring internationally with other acts, working as everything from a punk drummer to an artist manager.

Frost expands upon his signature sound with stand-out tracks such as “Tombstone” and “Make the Oceans Move,” blending elements of indie rock, punk and emo; all while exploring new and unconventional song structures amidst themes of life, love and redemption.

An album release party for Bucket List will be held Craft & Vinyl on Friday, November 1st with Something Else and Chase Duncan.

Bucket List will be available on all music streaming platforms on Friday, November 1st.

For more information, visit www.ZachFrost.com and follow Zach on social media @ZachFrostMusic

Track Listing:

  1. Tombstone
  2. Rock Bottom
  3. Make the Oceans Move
  4. Lying on the Floor
  5. Cheap Wine

Zach Frost - Bucket List Album Cover

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Ohio indie rock artist Zach Frost has announced that he will digitally release new single “Rock Bottom” accompanied by a music video on Friday, April 26th. Frost released debut solo EP I Try Not To Think About The Past in 2018 between touring internationally with other acts, working as everything from a punk drummer to an artist manager.

Frost improves upon his signature sound with “Rock Bottom,” blending elements of indie rock, dance punk and emo. “Rock Bottom” is the first single to be released from upcoming sophomore EP Bucket List, a progressive and introspective addition to his repertoire slated for an autumn 2019 release.

“Rock Bottom” and its accompanying music video will be available on all video and music streaming platforms on Friday, April 26th.

For more information, visit www.ZachFrost.com and follow Zach on social media @ZachFrostMusic

Instagram Post Admat SUBWAY

Written and performed by Zach Frost.
Additional guitars written and performed by Tim Waters and Garry Bair.
Recorded, mixed and mastered by Tim Waters at Radio City Records in Columbus, Ohio.
Music video produced by Jakob Mooney.
Music video photography by Tyler Sheehy.
Album cover photography by Kayla Kreller.
Marketing photography by Felix Kayser.
Graphic design by Stephen Goldstein.
Merchandise design by Stefan Brandow.
Marketing by Ryan Liptak.

All rights reserved. Lyrics used by permission only. Unauthorized duplication is a violation of applicable laws.
℗ © 2019 Zach Frost

Special thanks to Something Else, We Are The Movies, Chris Canfield, Lana Hurtado and friends, Aaron and Sarah, Aaron and Kat, Nathaniel Ward and everybody else who made this possible.

LYRICS

This t-shirt is a metaphor
Of how I lived my life before
Tattered, full of holes and worn
It wound up on the bathroom floor

Showing signs of wear and tear
The ends are frayed and hang threadbare
It’s something that I’ll never wear
Appears that it’s beyond repair

But I tried so many times to make it right
I couldn’t fight, stay up all night
As time ticks by, the less I try, the less I try

Rock bottom: when you’re sleeping on your ex’s couch
Rock bottom: when you crash into your best friend’s house
Rock bottom: when you wake up in a stranger’s car
Rock bottom: and I think I’ve taken things too far
Yeah, I think I’ve taken this too far

My future right in front of me
Clouded by my apathy
Fueled by drugs and whiskey
My family couldn’t rescue me

But they tried so many times to make it right
They couldn’t fight, stay up all night
As time ticks by, the less they try, the less they try

Rock bottom: when you’re sleeping on your ex’s couch
Rock bottom: when you crash into your best friend’s house
Rock bottom: when you wake up in a stranger’s car
Rock bottom: and I think I’ve taken things too far
Yeah, I think I’ve taken this too far

And it’s time to change
But what will remain?
I never wanted it to end this way

And it’s time to change
But what will remain?
I never wanted it to end this way

Rock bottom: when you’re sleeping on your ex’s couch
Rock bottom: when you crash into your best friend’s house
Rock bottom: when you wake up in a stranger’s car
Rock bottom: and I think I’ve taken things too far
Yeah, I think I’ve taken this too far

“Wanna go to Alaska June 22nd?”

That’s the text message I received back in January from my old bandmate, Tim Waters. He and Stephen Goldstein, our bass player from Someone Like You, rose from the ashes of our defunct easycore band to form We Are The Movies, an alternative pop-punk band based out of Columbus, Ohio.

Without hesitation, I immediately committed; because all I’d been hearing about for the past eight years was Alaska. Tim’s old band, Nothing Less, was a mainstay of the early 2000s Alaskan pop-punk scene, performing at the Alaska State Fair, Sullivan Arena, and the University of Alaska – Anchorage and Fairbanks campuses. Nothing Less went global in 2005 performing with the Vans Warped Tour across the United States and Canada and performing at such famed venues as the Whisky a Go Go in Hollywood and CBGB in New York.

I met Tim back in 2008 through a craigslist ad seeking a pop-punk drummer. Before I knew it, we had recorded an EP, had a couple of our songs on the soundtrack of the Best Documentary at the 2012 Mountain Film Awards, and were performing at America’s Longest Continually Running Music Venue, the Newport Music Hall. By the time 2010 rolled around, Stephen and I hit the road working for a magazine on Vans Warped Tour, working on the tour during the day and performing acoustic songs and promoting our album in the early mornings and late, late evenings. That summer took us everywhere from Boston, Massachusetts to the Mexican border in San Diego, California. We learned a lot about hard work that year, and that experience would come into play as we set off to Alaska to kick-off Vans Warped Tour 2016 at the Sullivan Arena in Anchorage.


Day 1 – A Formal Introduction

FullSizeRender
KWHL 106.5 FM
  • Anger Management, the entity behind Road to Warped Tour, books us on radio station KWHL 106.5 FM to perform live and interview with Bob & Chad on the morning show.
  • The boys perform “Happy EX-Mas” while I film and photograph.
  • The reality of having to be somewhere at 9:00 A.M. reminds us that being on the road is no different than having a day job back home.

Day 2 – The Warm-Up

IMG_8918
The Covenant House
  • Anger Management books us another show, this time at the Covenant House, a safe refuge which provides shelter for homeless youth in Alaska.
  • GCI, Alaska’s premier telecommunications provider, co-sponsors the event and provides 50 free tickets to the Road to Warped Tour. This will be the first time many of these kids have ever seen a concert.
  • I join the band on tambourine and we perform an acoustic set between speeches from GCI representatives and Covenant House.
  • Afterward, the boys do a signing and photo op while I give away free merchandise and coordinate with GCI. The kids go wild.

Day 2.5 – Wicked Wanda

  • We hop in the van and head over to Chilkoot Charlie’s, or simply “Koot’s,” a world famous bar and music venue where the band will headline the Warped Tour pre-party. Catering is served and we have dinner and watch the newest Game of Thrones with a band from New York called Behind the Façade. Good times.
  • The boys take the stage around midnight while the sun still blazes overhead. I sell merch and take photographs. We meet a girl who offers to sell merch for us at the festival the next day and we acquiesce.
  • Everyone is surprised to see the band Sleeping With Sirens in our audience, only to realize that they are only there to shoot pool and probably didn’t even notice us performing. Stephen and I laugh about the time we got into a fight with some of their members in Los Angeles in 2010.
  • We head off into the night to stir up some trouble in a brand new city.

Day 3 – The Big Day

FullSizeRender_1
Warped Tour 2010 in Los Angeles, CA vs. Warped Tour 2016 in Anchorage, AK
  • The sound of an alarm clock buzzing near my head is the worst possible thing I could hear after passing out a few hours earlier on a stranger’s floor.
  • We arrive early at Sullivan Arena and begin setting up the merch tent. The band performs soundcheck while I coordinate a professional photographer, catering, and freebies from the vendors.
  • We  Are The Movies perform on the main stage. They are the first band to perform at the first Vans Warped Tour event in 2016. I poorly livestream the event over facebook and try to maintain the appearance of professionalism.
  • We spend the rest of the day hanging backstage with our favorite bands, hustling for enough money to get home, and making new friends from all over the world. Our merch girl turns out to be the best damn merch girl any of us have ever seen. She promises to show us around the city later and again, we acquiesce.

Day 4 – Nature Beckons

FullSizeRender_4
Beluga Point
  • The next day is spent exploring Independence Mine State Historical Park in Wasilla. The views are breathtaking. We have a snowball fight in June. We drink water right out of the stream. We experience Alaska.
  • Later that night, Tim and Mike perform an acoustic set to raise money for an organization that teaches teens how to use multimedia. At this point, the band has made five appearances in four days. We eat our free pizza and drink our free wine as we have become accustomed to do.
  • The next several hours are spent moving from bar to restaurant to another stranger’s floor. It’s daylight before we blissfully drift off to sleep. We are beginning to get used to this.


Days 5 & 6 – The Tour Guide

FullSizeRender_2
Midnight in Alaska
  • Our merch girl turns out to actually be a legitimate tour guide with some serious expertise. We visit Earthquake Park, eat Thai food, see a moose, mistake a pod of Beluga whales for white caps, and spend the evening around a campfire singing Red Jumpsuit Apparatus songs on ukulele.


Day 7 – Home

  • Eventually we make our way to the airport. I have a layover in Phoenix while everyone else is at LAX. They see Charlie Day, while I see a desert. My girlfriend picks me up and I go back to normal life. Happy ex-mas, the war is over.FullSizeRender_3

**Special thanks to Chris and everyone at Road to Warped Tour, Pat for his hospitality, Chloe for her skills and company, and Rosie for her food, drinks, and floor to sleep on. I will never forget you, Alaska.**

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: musicians earn the most income through touring. Earlier this month, Billboard released their list of the 40 highest-paid musicians in the American music industry from 2014. This list took into account album sales, streaming royalties, publishing royalties, and touring revenue (to understand Billboard’s methodology, see the asterisk at the end of this article). Topping the list was British boy band One Direction, whose annual revenue totaled $46 million. 1D was ranked #13 in last year’s list, having since skyrocketed to fame, fortune, and infidelity.

The lowest earner in the top 40 was vintage rocker Tom Petty, whose greatest hits CD I was devastated to have lost in Germany in 2006, with a total earnings of just under $6.7 million. Perhaps Mr. Petty will see a fatter paycheck in 2015 after being awarded 12.5% writer’s credit for Sam Smith’s hit single “Stay With Me.” Taking into account all 40 artists, the average (mean) total revenue was approximately $14.7 million per artist. Looking at the chart below, you can see just who performed close to that average and who was well above or below.

Total Revenue by Artist
Total Revenue by Artist – Click for full size.

Based on the above data, if you’re a white, female pop singer, you’ve got a good chance of earning about $15 million per year (see: Gaga, T-Swift, Hannah Montana and Cher). If you’re an old man pop/rock band, (see: Tom Petty, Pearl Jam, James Taylor and Elton John), you’d be lucky to break half of that. Fortunately for us, we can break down these data and truly determine where the most money is being earned, and who exactly is earning it. Out of the collective $586 million earned by these 40 acts within one year, 80% of it was earned through live performances and package tours. The average tour earning per act was around $11.7 million, with an outlier of T-Swift who for some reason earned a whopping $0 (which I find hard to believe).

Total Income by Type
I am aware that this looks like Pac-Man eating slices of pizza and cheesecake.

Just like our total annual revenues, pop music scored another win raking in a total of $156 million in touring revenue. Pop music accounted for about 28% of the artists on this list, which is no surprise given that the genre got its name from the word “popular.” What is surprising, at least to me however, is that #6 on our list of not only highest touring revenue but highest earners in general, is truck-drivin’, dip-spittin’, beer-chuggin’ bro-country/pop sensation Luke Bryan. Country has definitely made its mark in recent years, with its fun and relatable lyrics (not my words) and live performances which are akin to music festivals with their own unique culture. These live country ho-downs have drawn almost $104 million in touring revenues, putting country just behind rock and roll (which is still $20 million less lucrative than pop music).

Touring Revenue by Genre
Touring Revenue by Genre – Click for full size.

American music is dominated by mainstream caucasian artists, which is understandable considering 78% of the population identifies as white. Don’t be so quick to judge though, as historically black-dominated hip-hop and R&B accrued a total of over $72 million dollars, and latin music earned $27 million between just two performers on this list. The Latino community is one of the fastest growing communities in the United States, and with stars like Bruno Mars on the rise, we can expect to see them make up a much larger demographic in American music throughout the next decade.

twin-shadow-zsniderman
Shoutout to Twin Shadow, the next Latino-American rockstar

One of the more technologically interesting aspects of this article is how much money was earned through streaming services. Companies like Spotify have been in the media recently due to their poor payment practices and royalty rates, with artists as high-profile as Taylor Swift proudly boycotting their business model. Ms. Swift earned just over $600,000 from streaming services before removing her catalogue late last year, due to Spotify not appropriately valuing her “art.” In her defense, however, T-Dog was the highest paid musician when it came to album sales, reaching almost $10 million in revenue. The least paid streaming artist was an old hippie group called Phish, whom most of you youngins have probably never heard of. Phish earned a grand total of $7,200 from streaming, likely due to their fan base being too high to understand how to properly use a computer.

In all seriousness, we should be excited. People are buying music again, and the industry is on the mend. Remember when your only option was choosing between an expensive CD and iTunes download or pirating the album and risking your computer? I’m not saying that streaming is the best solution, for the artists or the fans, but at least it offers a better alternative for artists to get their music distributed. Streaming accounted for about $12 million in royalties between only 40 artists. That’s a lot of money once you think about it. If these guys can become millionaires writing the same recycled pop tunes, then maybe someday you can move out of your parent’s basement. Maybe.

*BILLBOARD METHODOLOGY: Money Makers was compiled with Nielsen Music and Billboard Boxscore, 2014 U.S. data only. Revenue from merchandising, synchronization and sponsorship is not included. The following royalty rates, minus a 4 percent producer’s fee, were used: album and track sales, 22 percent of retail revenue; streaming revenue, 22 percent for current acts and 50 percent for heritage acts. Publishing royalties were estimated using statutory mechanical rates for album and track sales and the Copyright Royalty Board streaming formula; for labels’ direct deals with interactive services, blended audio and video rates of, respectively, $0.0075 and $0.0045. (A 10 percent manager’s fee was deducted from each category.) Touring revenue equals 34 percent of an act’s Boxscore.